Afrotexan.Com

 Portal To Afrotexan History
General Slavery Latter 19th Century Reconstruction 20th Century Notables Books

 

Compiled, Arranged, and Edited By
Theodore Bolton

 

 

 

A number years ago I became interested in my genealogy. I yearn to know where I came from?  Who I was? Who were my fore parents, what kind of life did they lived? So many questions. But I found out that there were not a lot of readily available answers. I realized in a personal way that black history was and is now suppressed.

  I am determined to know the answers to the question that I have. I am especially determined to tell of the Afrotexan's struggles. Sadly, a major part of their story is one of bondage, inhumanity, degradation, second-class citizenship, and worse. For all the evils that they had to overcome theirs is also a story of perseverance, of triumph, of love, of humanity. This website is my small and humble testament to those who gave so much and received so little. 

 

 

 

  Barbara Jordan  

In 1967 she was elected to a seat in the Texas Senate, where she was the first black state senator since 1883. She was the first black woman from a Southern state to serve in Congress, and, with Andrew Young, was the first of two African Americans to be elected to Congress from the South in the twentieth century.

William Massey

 Leader of Texas Baptists. Rev. Massey served as president of the Missionary and Educational Convention of Texas for fourteen years. Rev. Massey was also President of the Texas State Convention. He  served as one of the National Baptist Convention  vice presidents

Rev. William Massey was born in slavery, escaped and enlisted in the Union army, He was among the first colored teachers in Texas. Rev. Massey's education was not very extensive, and he never attended school. His alphabet was taught him by his young mistress at Alexandria, Va. He was one of the founders and served as the first president of the Baptist State Convention of Texas, He was president for fourteen years.  He also served as one of two vice presidents of the National Baptist Convention. 

 

 

Historically Black Colleges In Texas

The Afro Texan Press The Early Years

Republican Party of Texas First 50 Years

Tribute to Former Slaves of Texas

The Freedmen's Bureau in Texas

African American Laws of 19th-Century Texas

The Union League of Texas

Early African American Legislators

Each One Teach One: The Education of  the Texas  Freedmen 

   

African Americans in Camp County

African Americans in Harrison County

African Americans in Marion County

African Americans in Upshur County

Old Buildings of Harrison County

Historic Buildings of Marion County

Your Bible (My first site)

 

Norris Wright Cuney 

 In 1886 he became Texas national committeeman of the Republican party, the most important political position given to a black man of the South in the nineteenth century. One historian of the Republican party in Texas characterizes the period between 1884 and 1896 as the "Cuney Era."

   

William Madison (Gooseneck Bill) McDonald

After the death of Norris Wright Cuney in 1897, McDonald became leader of the Texas Republicans. In 1896 he formed a political partnership with Edward Howland Robinson Green. Control of the party was wrested from them in 1900 by the "Lily Whites."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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